Product Idea |

1961 Triumph TR6 Trophy

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The Bike
The Trophy was produced by Triumph Motorcycles in their Meridian Factory from 1956 to 1973 as a 650cc Twin and aimed particularly at the American market where it achieved some considerable success particularly with California desert racing.
During this time, it won numerous competitions throughout the late 1950s and 1960s and was particularly favoured by a certain famous US actor who took it to further fame with one of the most iconic motorcycle stunts in cinema history on a model that was modified especially for that movie. 
In the UK it was also popular with Rockers, Café Racers and the Ton Up club, where the magical goal of reaching the ‘ton’ (100mph) was a prize often fought for on the roads of Britain (and unfortunately also died for) .

Why build it?
I love Lego, I love motorcycles, I love Lego motorcycles, but I really favour the classic styles over the more modern bike. (I ride a Royal Enfield Bullet myself). 
Initially I wanted to build ‘that’ motorcycle from ‘that’ film for myself, as a homage to one of my favourite films of all time, one of the most iconic stunts of all time, and it also happens to have come out the year I was born (so like me its 60 next year) .

Lego’s IP rules obviously mean I cannot present that here, (yes I do have one…now, as part of a diorama I am making for myself). However, the bike behind it is still an iconic classic that achieved fame and status; in its own right; and in my opinion, worthy of being immortalised in Lego. 

Why would it make a good Lego kit?
Because it’s a Classic Motorcycle!
It is iconic in its style and look, and would look great in any Lego modellers collection.
If Lego had one I would have bought it and saved myself nearly 3 months trying to build it myself :-)   


How did I build it?
I started by looking at the Lego bikes I had, in particular the Moto Cross bike (42007) and quickly realised I didn’t have enough parts. So I started in Brick Links Studio 2 and used that to throw down the basic frame shape, engine and angles I wanted.  I also used Studio to test build various ideas and parts of the bike, many of which I eventually used in putting it all together, both in Studio and in real bricks. .
 
One or two areas were a considerable challenge, especially trying to achieve the rear sprocket and brake on the same side, and running the rear brake link outside the left rear shock to the footpeg.

In the real Trophy this was done with a concentric sprocket and drum, something no amount of playing with Lego parts would achieve, and for a long time I consoled myself with the idea that I was going to have to make do with them on opposing sides. 

Then one day I was just playing and put a couple of parts together that resembled the drum brake a little closer. When I suddenly saw how I could achieve both, if I was willing to sacrifice wheel rotation (it was always going to be a static model anyway). Within minutes I had taken the back end apart, along with half the engine, and was putting it back together with my idea included and it worked! 
I was so happy I nearly danced around the living room (not a pretty sight) and from there most of the rest fell into place. I had rebuilt it so many times by this point I could swap exhausts, seats, and tanks in minutes. I have around 30 half built designs for bits on Studio and this made it much easier putting the final sections together.

So now I have the main bike, the Desert Sled variation mod (a simple exhaust swap)
The accessories image also shows a solo seat and rack that could help build 'another' version (with the black tiles allowing you to remove the LH tank/toolbox )
Both are easy to build additions, that are not too hard to swap over, so you could choose which style you want. 

Images
I have included pictures of my actual build, that does have some mixing of colours as it was all I had.
It shows its possible (and quite stable) and includes hoses and some bits that I couldn't get to work in Studio
The rendered images are to show the colour possibilities (including parts I don't have in those colours ).
and both show the Desert Sled version too.

Why Green?
Well it doesn’t have to be, The original 1961 Tr6 was red and silver, but I like BRG (British Racing Green) and I already had the parts for a lot that. Also British Racing Green (BRG) is kind of synonymous with British classics and racing.
The majority of the parts that set the colour scheme are fairly standard, so any Lego modeller could hopefully find or get them cheaply enough to build their own favourite colour scheme. 

Model Stats
Length 34cm
Height 14 cm
Width 13 cm
No of Parts (approx.) 660 (700 with mod kits)
The Real Triumph Trophy Specs
Manufacturer   Triumph
Also called          'Desert Sled'
Production         1956–1973
Engine 649 cc (39.6 cu in) four-stroke, parallel-twin
Compression ratio          8.5/9:1
Power  34–46 bhp @ 6,500 rpm
Top speed: 110mph (approx.)
Transmission     4-speed (5-TR6RV)
Wheelbase        55 in (140 cm)
Dimensions       L: 84 in (214 cm)
W: 27½ in (70 cm)
Seat height        32.5 in (82.5 cm)
Weight 365 lb (166 kg) (dry)
Fuel capacity     3 gal (us )/ 4 gal (imp)



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