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  • LEGO Ideas will be offline May 30 and 31st for a Software Upgrade

    On May 30th at 7:00am Eastern US Time (EST), LEGO Ideas will go offline for a scheduled upgrade. We expect to be offline for 24 hours and back online the morning of May 31st. This scheduled maintenance takes longer than usual because we’re upgrading our entire software platform to a new version. We’re migrating all of the site data (including your projects, supports, comments, and profiles) to new servers … including about 65 million unique events and actions since we launched the old LEGO CUUSOO site in 2008!

    Most of this upgrade is behind the scenes. It’s like we’re putting a stronger foundation under our building, so we can build higher in the future. The most noticeable change is that all project URLs will change from a few numbers to a longer unique identifier. Don't worry though, any links to the old project URLs will redirect to the new ones. Other changes will be small, for example headers on the Guidelines page will look slightly different, and some links and buttons may move slightly. Overall, LEGO Ideas will continue to work as it always has. We’ll share more about future updates to Ideas when we’re ready.

    Our team is looking forward to the new platform capabilities behind the scenes, and to building a better LEGO Ideas experience going forward.

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  • 10K Club Interview: Meet Jacob Sadovich of Ship In A Bottle, The Flagship Leviathan

    • lego ideas
    • 10k club
    • jacob sadovich
    • ship in a bottle the flagship leviathan

    This week's 10K Club interview brings us to the USA, as we have the pleasure to introduce the builder of the uniquely shaped Ship In A Bottle, The Flagship Leviathan project, which took a short 48 days to accomplish its 10K goal. Please welcome its creator Jacob Sadovich, known as JakeSadovich77 on LEGO Ideas. 

    It's certainly not every day that we see a transparent bottle built of LEGO bricks (some in the LEGO team even thought it was a glass bottle), so Jacob's challenges when designing this model were particularly interesting to hear about.

    Help us congratulate Jacob on joining the exclusive LEGO Ideas 10K Club!
     

     

    About Yourself

    1. Where are you from?
      Garden City, Idaho, USA.

     

    1. How old are you?
      39.

     

    1. What do you study or do for a living?
      I'm a screenprinting.

     

    1. What hobbies do you have?
      Scale models, refurbishing/building bicycles, reading, but mostly building with LEGO.

     


    ^ Jacob showing off his pride and joy!

     

    1. How and when did your interest for LEGO come about?
      So long ago that I can’t even remember.

     

    1. What is your favourite official LEGO set? Why?
      70810 MetalBeard's Sea Cow - because it’s awesome.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO element? Why?
      3839. It's my go too for "guns" on small minifig scale starfighters.

     

    1. Is there a LEGO designer (official LEGO designer or fan designer) who you are inspired by and look up to? Who and why?
      Sadly, I must admit that I don’t know the names of all the official designers, but as far as fan designers I find Letranger Absurde to be quite skilled and wildly entertaining, also Corey Mitchell builds a mean castle, and my favorite trains belong to one Matt Pratt.

     

    1. Is there one or more particular LEGO related websites (not official LEGO websites) that you visit often and/or are inspired by?
      The Brothers Brick mostly.

     

    About Your Project

    1. Where did your interest in this particular model come from?
      I constructed an actual ship in a bottle a few years ago. I started wondering around a year and a half ago if I could do one in LEGO bricks - bottle and all.

     

    1. What special challenges did you face creating the model? What was the most difficult part to recreate?
      The minifig snowshoes as pierce-work windows at the rear of the stern castle took around two and a half hours one evening and I just couldn’t get it to work properly so I gave up for the day. The next day at work I daydreamed about it all day trying to puzzle out a solution and had a couple ideas. I got home and it took about five minutes to finish. Just a few days ago as I was recreating it in LDD and I found a part that would work even better to support the snowshoes, so I finally figured it out you could say.

      Another rather tricky bit was the bottom of the bottle. I left it till last as I had no idea if I could do it or not. The problem with the bottle was the “color” trans clear, not a lot of plate size variations in trans clear exist. Also, in case it wasn’t difficult enough already, I just had to have a 10x10 dish in the middle to showcase my fancy pants stern castle windows. Why spend all that time on windows you can’t even see right? In the end I cobbled together a whole lot of 1x2s in conjunction with 2x2 boat studs and one 10x10 dish.

     


    ^ This is not your every day shipyard

     

    1. How long did it take to complete the model?
      About three weeks.

     

    1. How did it feel when you reached the magic 10,000 votes and how long did it take?
      Awesome and kind of strange, as there were several feelings all at once. Excitement at reaching the 10k mark, and in just 48 days, a great feeling of satisfaction that so many people liked my MOC, and gratitude that they took the time to support it and make this happen. Also a nearly palpable sense of relief that my short lived career as a human spambot on Facebook and other social media had come to an end and all these nice people could go about their business without me hounding them all the time.

     

    1. Approximately how many LEGO bricks did you use to create your model?
      A little under 1400.


    About LEGO Ideas

    1. Do you have any useful advice about creating a successful LEGO Ideas project?
      Just build the things that you enjoy building. I built this MOC just to see if I could. It was only after I posted it on Facebook and received a lot of positive feedback and suggestions that I submit it to LEGO Ideas that I even dreamed of submitting it, and here I am answering interview questions.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO Ideas project (besides your own of course)?
      There are several that I like. One that really sticks out to me is the Big Steam Tractor by Mr_Kleinstein. I really like some of the parts usage and color scheme, as well as the nostalgia of this older machine.

     

    1. What is it about the platform that attracts you? What tips would you give to anyone who is thinking about uploading an idea?
      I like the platform because it gives fans the opportunity to have their MOCs reviewed by actual LEGO designers and the potential to have their own idea produced as an official set. Other than my answer to question #1 of this section, I would suggest getting feedback from other LEGO enthusiasts before submitting.

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  • 10K Club Interview: Meet Damien & Aiden MacRae of Surf Rescue

    • lego ideas
    • 10k club
    • damien macrae
    • surf rescue

    Author's note:

    This week we're presenting a special edition of the 10K Club Interview to highlight and celebrate the achievements of Damien MacRae a.k.a LegoSurfRescue, one of the co-creators of the Surf Rescue project, whose collaborative project with his son, Aiden, achieved 10,000 supporters in the middle of April 2017. 

    Some of you may be wondering why we're publishing Damien and Aiden's 10K Club Interview months ahead of schedule - and there's good reason. Although we've known for a while that Damien was ill with an aggressive form of skin cancer, which inspired their project, we were recently informed of the sad news that doctors diagnosed Damien's illness as incurable; giving him only 6-10 weeks to live. Damien hasn't given up hope, however and fights for a miracle.  

    10K Club members often speak of their excitement in reading the 10K Club Interviews and of the words of encouragement and support that wash ashore from fellow LEGO Ideas members. We didn't want Damien to miss out on this opportunity to share and celebrate this moment with his family, friends, colleagues and even supportive strangers, who've all rallied behind Damien and Aiden's project over the last few months. This level of support, comradery and celebration of creativity truly defines the LEGO community that we know and love.

    We hope that everyone will take a moment in joining us to congratulate Damien and Aiden for their achievement on becoming a part of the exclusive LEGO Ideas 10K Club! Congrats on behalf of the LEGO Group!

    --

    It's time to learn more about Damien and Aiden's LEGO story and their journey to this milestone!

     

     

    About Yourself

    1. Where are you from?
      Aiden & Damien: We’re both from Sydney, Australia.

     

    1. How old are you?
      Aiden: 7 (6 when we started building the set).

      Damien: 42 (41 when we started).

     


    ^ Damien and Aiden flash big smiles as they show-off their Surf Rescue project

     

    1. What do you study or do for a living?
      Aiden: I’m at primary school in Year 2.

      Damien: I’m an intellectual property lawyer but am currently on leave for health reasons.

     

    1. What hobbies do you have?
      Aiden: Writing books. Making crafts and other arts. Collecting and trading Pokémon cards. Collecting stuffed toys such as Cheepee the Chicken. Playing chess and tennis. Cooking :)

      Damien: I collect movie flyers, interesting trivia, and I run trivia nights. I also love photography, graphic design, and ideas in general (inspired by the AWARD School course I competed for and completed in Sydney in 2012).

     

    1. How and when did your interest for LEGO come about?
      Aiden: My mum says I was playing with Duplo at 14 months, making towers and trains.

      Damien: When I was 5 years-old my twin brother Drew and I started playing with the Lego city and space sets and I got really obsessed with the Lego train set we received for Christmas, when we were a bit older. I didn’t touch a Lego piece again until my son was born and we started giving it to him for his birthdays and Christmas. My obsession re-started then. 

     

    1. What is your favourite official LEGO set? Why?
      Aiden: LEGO® NINJAGO® 70594 The Lighthouse Siege because of the light.

      Damien: I love Angus MacLane’s WALL-E because it looks and feels like it is a real WALL-E (plus Aiden and I are big fans of the movie). Alatariel’s Research Institute was also a big inspiration for me – it’s an awesome idea and the execution is fantastic. I’m also a big fan of the Lego advent calendars such as Lego Star Wars Advent Calendar because the designs are always so clever with a minimum of instruction and I love how excited Aiden gets about them in the leadup to Christmas each year.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO element? Why?
      Aiden: The LEGO Round Plates 1 x 1 because they’re nice-looking and can be used to represent anything – from water, treasure, lava, and so forth. And I like the LEGO Shell Without Rounded Inside Edge (30218) aka “clammy”, because he can drive the jetski.

      Damien: The LEGO White Slope Curved 4 x 1 because when I saw it I knew immediately it would be a way of taking a new approach to waves in the Lego universe, one that reflected the beaches and waves Aiden and I are exposed to in Australia. Plus I love the LEGO Transparent Light Blue Flame with Base Rim no Pins because in the same set it can be a shower stream, jellyfish tentacle, or even a splash at the back of the water vehicles. 

     


    ^ Damien and Aiden appear on the Australian breakfast television show "Weekend Sunrise" together with their Surf Resue project

     

    1. Is there a LEGO designer (official LEGO designer or fan designer) who you are inspired by and look up to? Who and why?
      Damien: JakeSadovich77’s Ship In A Bottle is an amazing idea and his execution is perfect. Then there is DeTomaso whose Bird project is exquisite!

     

    1. Is there one or more particular LEGO related websites (not official LEGO websites) that you visit often and/or are inspired by?
      Damien: The Brothers Brick, MinifigsMe, Bricklink, Brickowl.

     

    About Your Project

    1. Where did your interest in this particular model come from?
      Aiden: We had been to the beach in Hawaii/Maui and in Nelson Bay near my Grandad’s. I love making sandcastles and kicking the waves.

      Damien: I had always dreamed of having a fully-featured beach set when I was young to add to my LEGO City sets, so when Aiden suggested it, I wondered whether LEGO had released one in the years since my childhood. Turns out they hadn’t, so I thought it was a great opportunity for Aiden and I to explore. I also have stage 4 melanoma and have become passionate about educating people about the dangers of the sun and the importance of wearing sun protection such as sunscreen, sunglasses, hats, long-sleeves. It only occurred to me later that we could combine the ideas in the same set.

     

    1. What special challenges did you face creating the model? What was the most difficult part to recreate?
      Damien: We really wanted to make the set in real life and not in one of the cool digital design programs. That meant us trawling through the thousands of LEGO pieces we have in order to find each individual piece. And then there pieces like the waves that we didn’t have and so we got online and found them in far-off locales like Belgium and the USA.

      In terms of difficulty, it took us a few weeks to create a rockpool that reflected what we see at our local beaches..

     

    1. How long did it take to complete the model?
      Damien: After Aiden came up with the idea, I let the idea sit there in our minds. In other words I procrastinated until Aiden really pushed me to help him make it. When we finally started working on it it took about 3 months to complete!

     

    1. How did it feel when you reached the magic 10,000 votes and how long did it take?
      Aiden: Very, very exciting.

      Damien: Extraordinary. I was on top of the world. And even more excited by watching Aiden getting excited as it reached closer to the target. I’ll never be prouder than watching him glow and grow confidence and joy as our support rose. We launched in October 2016. It took us about 5 and a half months to reach the 3K mark. And then all of a sudden we got a surge of interest and the final 7K took us a week(!!)

     


    ^ The MacRae's celebrated the 10K news with a few flowers and some bubbles!

     

    1. Approximately how many LEGO bricks did you use to create your model?
      Aiden & Damien: Approx. 250.


    About LEGO Ideas

    1. Do you have any useful advice about creating a successful LEGO Ideas project?
      Damien: I’m no expert, but I would suggest thinking carefully about playability, flexibility, the cost, and who your audience/market is. Shelf pieces are awesome and very popular but if you can turn it into a set that not only looks good on a shelf, but is playable and can be reconfigured by kids (like the WALL-E set), you’re probably on to a winner.

      Also, think about:
      – the possible stories that you can weave into your product description;
      – branding (stick a simple but professional-looking logo on each image using an app like Sketch);
      – the best name for your set (keep it simple and descriptive);
      – taking the best photos you can of the set. I taught myself how to create a light box in order to take clear product shots on a white background and I think it was well worth the time and energy.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO Ideas project (besides your own of course)?
      Aiden: Currently, Pusheen the Cat by kevinszeto and Skull Island by Grant_Davis_.

      Damien: Apart from the other models I’ve mentioned above, I love the Pop-Up Book idea by JKBrickworks and Grant_Davis_, and I have a soft spot for all of Lightningtiger’s projects, seeing as they quite accurately reflect my life in Australia.

     

    1. What is it about the platform that attracts you? What tips would you give to anyone who is thinking about uploading an idea?
      Damien: I love that its focus is purely on ideas. Execution of those ideas is important but really only in terms of promotion. But I think the fact that anyone can come up with an idea and gather support to make it into a real set, is just gold. It’s crowdsourcing done well.

      In terms of tips: take your time to get the concept/idea right in the first place before rocketing ahead to building. If you get the idea right (like “pop-up book”, “sunscreen-wearing heroes patrolling a beach”, “ship in a bottle”) the execution will just follow.

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  • 10K Club Interview: Meet James Cox of 1950's Diner

    • lego ideas
    • 10k club
    • james cox
    • 1950's diner

    From classic cars to classic buildings - this week's 10K Club member can do a bit of both to great effect. Please welcome James Cox, better known to many of you as pix027, the fan designer of the 1950's Diner; the perfect setting for countless Hollywood movies, whether set in the past, present or future. 

    As a relative newcomer back into the world of LEGO building, James has quickly found his footing and an interest within designing LEGO models that often have a historic twist to them.

    Help us congratulate James on joining the exclusive LEGO Ideas 10K Club!
     

     

    About Yourself

    1. Where are you from?
      I live in East London, in the UK.

     

    1. How old are you?
      29 years old.

     

    1. What do you study or do for a living?
      I am roofer in the family business.

     

    1. What hobbies do you have?
      Laying down, eating biscuits and building with LEGO bricks. I do a physical job so I like my hobbies to be mostly sofa-based.

     

     


    ^ James shows off one of his exquisite MOCs that's in the works. Can anyone guess what make it is?

     

    1. How and when did your interest for LEGO come about?
      I was very LEGO obsessed as a child but grew out of it when I was around 11 years old. It wasn’t until Christmas 2 years ago that my girlfriend bought me the LEGO Technic 42030 VOLVO L350F Wheel Loader, that got me back into building with LEGO bricks, once I had seen how much more advanced it could be.
    1. What is your favourite official LEGO set? Why?
      10194 Emerald Night is the set I would buy if it was available today because a really good LEGO set should be playable and displayable and you should want to open and enjoy it even though you know it will be worth more money one day.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO element? Why?
      The 1x2 curved slope always seems to be in everything I build.

     

    1. Is there a LEGO designer (official LEGO designer or fan designer) who you are inspired by and look up to? Who and why?
      I am a big fan of Sariel, and whenever I find something really impressive on the internet, it nearly always turns out to be one of his models.

     

    1. Is there one or more particular LEGO related websites (not official LEGO websites) that you visit often and/or are inspired by?
      I find Rebrickable really useful for the admin side of LEGO building and trying to work out what I have. But when it comes to inspiration I tend to just come across things on social media or google searches.

     

    About Your Project

    1. Where did your interest in this particular model come from?
      I knew I wanted to create a set that had the classy feel of the modular building series whilst keeping it smaller and more affordable than the modulars. So the only choice for a small building for me was to do a 1950's diner as it has so much colour and fun in such a small building. The added bonus with a 50's diner was that it fit in with a modern LEGO city setting as well as the period modulars and various other LEGO themes, hopefully, making it appeal to all types and ages of LEGO fans.

     

    1. What special challenges did you face creating the model? What was the most difficult part to recreate?
      The main challenge was to keep the set small without it feeling cramped or compromised, whilst arranging the interior to flow and look natural took a lot of redesigning. I also wanted to keep the set from having any obviously modern features, leaving it up to the customer if they want to imagine it in a modern, period or even futuristic setting, as 50's diners can exist in many worlds.

     

    1. How long did it take to complete the model?
      I think about 4 days of solid building in LDD and then 2 days of repeatedly changing the colours of everything until I was happy. A few hours were spent on updates, mostly tweaking the design of the car!

     


    ^ LEGO Digital Designer (LDD) was James' go-to tool for mocking up his 1950's Diner.

     

    1. How did it feel when you reached the magic 10,000 votes and how long did it take?
      It took around 10 months and the last month went really quickly, so it was really satisfying to watch it creep up each day.

     

    1. Approximately how many LEGO bricks did you use to create your model?
      Around 900 pieces all in I think. But there is the possibility to bring the piece count down by removing the car and fuel pump.


    About LEGO Ideas

    1. Do you have any useful advice about creating a successful LEGO Ideas project?
      Be realistic and think about what people actually want to walk out of the LEGO store with.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO Ideas project (besides your own of course)?
      21303 Wall-E is a really great set and sits on our windowsill at home. It's such a nicely designed set. Even the packaging and instructions feel like some real care went into it.

     

    1. What is it about the platform that attracts you? What tips would you give to anyone who is thinking about uploading an idea?
      I like that you really can just upload something and get to 10,000 supporters based purely on the quality of a design. Besides sharing a few times on Facebook I did basically no campaigning. So a big thanks to the other LEGO Ideas members! I would say it's definitely worth putting your ideas up just to see what happens. It isn't just a popularity contest like a lot of 'user based' websites or competitions.

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  • 10K Club Interview: Meet Kevin Szeto of Vintage Tram

    • lego ideas
    • 10k club
    • kevin szeto
    • vintage tram

    Some say he lives in a Yellow Submarine, others say he lives in Toronto. What we're 100% certain of is that this week's 10K Club member is the one and only Kevin Szeto, a.k.a kevinszeto, whose Vintage Tram project hit the magical 10,000 supporters mark in December 2016. 

    If you've got a strange feeling that you've heard that name somewhere before then we're quite certain we know why. Kevin was propelled into the LEGO Ideas hall of fame last year when his Beatles Yellow Submarine project was selected to become one of the next LEGO Ideas sets. Now Kevin is back in the spotlight with his latest 10K project. 

    Help us congratulate Kevin on becoming a part of the exclusive LEGO Ideas 10K Club - once again!!
     

     

    About Yourself

    1. Where are you from?
      I'm from Toronto, Canada.

     

    1. How old are you?
      37 years old.

     

    1. What do you study or do for a living?
      I work as an aerospace engineer for a large corporation that designs and manufactures turbine engines for aircraft.

     

    1. What hobbies do you have?
      I enjoy playing and composing music, travelling, photography, reading, hockey, volleyball, and playing with LEGO (of course).

     

    1. How and when did your interest for LEGO come about?
      Like many adult LEGO fans, I started playing with LEGO since I was a little kid, and just never really stopped. It was by far my favourite toy growing up, as it allowed me to foster my creativity and imagination. Most of my early sets were space or castle themed. Later on, I became fascinated by LEGO Technic, which perhaps led me to engineering as a profession.

       

    1. What is your favourite official LEGO set? Why?
      I don't think I have one favourite official LEGO set, but I very much appreciate the Creator Expert models such as the Volkswagen Beetle, the Mini Cooper, and the Ferrari F40. These sets tend to feature a lot of unique building techniques and innovative uses of parts that I find very interesting and rewarding.

     


    ^ Kevin's LEGO workspace includes a display of some of his favourite LEGO Creator Expert cars, but we're admittedly intrigued by his road sign displayed in the top left corner.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO element? Why?
      I really like creating studless models. As such, I love using SNOT elements that allow me to attach tiles, slopes, curved slopes, and other elements in interesting ways.

     

    1. Is there a LEGO designer (official LEGO designer or fan designer) who you are inspired by and look up to? Who and why?
      There are plenty of inspirational creators in the LEGO community, both on LEGO Ideas and on other forums. If I had to mention one, it would probably be Jason Allemann (a.k.a JKBrickworks). I find his creations so elegant and original. In my opinion he really takes LEGO design to a whole new level!

     

    1. Is there one or more particular LEGO related websites (not official LEGO websites) that you visit often and/or are inspired by?
      One of the sites I frequent is the YouTube channel from Jangbricks. I enjoy watching his set reviews, as well as his huge and everchanging MOC city.

     

    About Your Project

    1. Where did your interest in this particular model come from?
      In the Fall of 2015 I took a 2-week backpacking trip to Portugal. Among the many places I visited was Porto, which is the 2nd largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Among the many neat things I encountered in both Porto and Lisbon were historic trams. After my trip I endeavoured to learn more about the fascinating history of trams – how they evolved from horse-drawn and steam-powered predecessors, how they were later replaced by buses, and how they have made a comeback. This model was my attempt to replicate the historic Porto tram, and also pay homage to cities around the world that have made efforts to preserve the living history of rail transport.

     

    1. What special challenges did you face creating the model? What was the most difficult part to recreate?
      This tram model had several challenges. The first was that I wanted to have a removable top, include the interior seating details, while still keeping the walls reasonably sturdy. This was complicated by the fact that the main panels below the windows were built sideways. Overall I'm happy with the result. Perhaps yet another challenge was incorporating functional doors. The doors on the real tram open and close in the middle (i.e. like French doors), but it was too difficult given the 3-stud-wide space. I simplified it with just a hinge on one side instead. Lastly, the tram's roof at the front and rear sections are 7 studs wide, while that of the main body is 8 studs wide. It was a little challenging to get the transition right.

     


    ^ Kevin prototypes his Vintage Tram in LEGO Digital Designer 

     

    1. How long did it take to complete the model?
      This Porto tram model actually evolved from a Lisbon tram that I had built first. Nevertheless, I did spend a lot of time refining the details and improving the build, even after I had submitted the model. (You can see these changes in the “Updates” section). I definitely spent considerably more time on this model than on my previous submissions, and I think it shows from the level of detail in the final version. But I couldn't tally how much time I spent because I changed, refined, and tweaked it so much!

     

    1. How did it feel when you reached the magic 10,000 votes and how long did it take?
      This model took about 13.5 months to reach 10,000 supporters. It was, of course, a magical moment for me as well as for my family and friends who supported this creation. I should mention that I was overwhelmed by the support from all around the world, even though the model was based on something from one particular city and would not be immediately recognizable. Perhaps trams are inherently beautiful; I imagine that trams from other parts of the world could potentially be turned into LEGO models as well.

     

    1. Approximately how many LEGO bricks did you use to create your model?
      Including the 4 minifigures, the model consists of just over 700 pieces.


    About LEGO Ideas

    1. Do you have any useful advice about creating a successful LEGO Ideas project?
      There are perhaps two pieces of advice I can give. The first is to try to ensure that the title / thumbnail image is the absolute best and most attractive it can be. You want to entice people to click on your creation. The second and most important advice is that promoting your submission is an absolute must. Look for sites, pages, forums, etc that are related to your submission and try to get people to talk about and share your creation.

     

    1. What is your favourite LEGO Ideas project (besides your own of course)?
      Hard to choose. There are so many excellent submissions. Perhaps a recent favourite is the “Ship In A Bottle” project by JakeSadovich77. It is such a wonderful and unique idea.

     


    ^ Kevin poses with the Yellow Submarine at the hugely popular signing event in Liverpool, England

     

    1. What is it about the platform that attracts you? What tips would you give to anyone who is thinking about uploading an idea?
      The LEGO Ideas platform allows people to share their beautiful, amazing, innovative, and original LEGO creations, regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, religious beliefs, etc. It is a pleasure to discover, discuss, and learn from what LEGO enthusiasts from all around the world are capable of producing. As exemplified by all the projects on LEGO Ideas, imagination is truly the only limit.

      On top of the aforementioned tips, I think it is important to submit projects that are meaningful to you. Create things with which you have a real connection to or by which you are inspired. Also, do not be discouraged to submit new projects even if past projects do not garner the support you had hoped for. Learn from the experience, and see what can be done to improve your approach. Stay positive.

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